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As 1970 Bruins Are Celebrated, Bobby Orr Celebrates Real Heroes

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As the 1970 Boston Bruins team and Bobby Orr continue to be celebrated in advance of the 50th anniversary of their Stanley Cup win over the St. Louis Blues and Orr’s historic overtime and series-clinching goal in Game 4, Orr made sure to keep things in perspective and honor the real heroes in society today: Coronavirus frontline workers. 

“We’re celebrating a sporting event, that’s great. But with everything that’s going on, I think it’s a good time to celebrate and thank all of the front-line workers, first responders, all the different organizations that are assisting our healthcare providers,” Orr told the media in a Zoom call. “These people go to work every day making huge sacrifices, they’re saving lives, comforting so many people. I played a game and they call us heroes? I don’t think so. It’s not a game to these healthcare workers, these front-liners, it’s real life. I think we do owe them so much. We say thank you.”

Orr is participating in a raffle of a replica Bobby Orr statue with the money raised going to support frontline workers battling COVID-19. The hall of fame defenseman and arguably the greatest player to ever lace em up will also make a personal call to anyone the winner would like him to on Mother’s Day Sunday. 

Besides winning the Stanley Cup twice, Orr won the 1966-67 Calder Trophy, eight Norris Trophies, two Art Ross trophies, three Hart Trophies, two Conn Smythe trophies and a Ted Lindsay Award. Despite all those accolades, Orr’s most endearing quality has always been how humble he is and everything he does to help those less fortunate. 

“I just look at it like I was one of the lucky ones that got to play a great game, played with some wonderful people, met wonderful people throughout my career,” said Orr. “I just feel like a lucky guy. I was playing a game, was being paid to play a game. That’s a pretty good position to be in. I don’t think a lot about being the greatest or anything like that. That really isn’t my thing.”

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The NHL Network will air a documentary The 1970 Bruins: Big, Bad & Bobby on Sunday night at 8 PM. 

With 20 years of experience (SiriusXM NHL Network Radio, ESPNBoston, NESN, NHL.com, etc.) covering the Bruins, the NHL, NCAA and junior hockey and more, Jimmy Murphy’s hockey black book is full of Hall of Famers, current players, coaches, management, scouts and a wide array of hockey media personalities that have lived in and around this great game. For 17 of his 20 years as a hockey and sports reporter, Murph covered the Bruins on essentially a daily basis covering their victorious 2011 Stanley Cup run and their 2013 run to the Final as well. Murphy has hosted national and local radio shows and podcasts and also has experience in TV as well.

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